Kinocomputing |||

Protocol

kinocomputing.com” is a permissionless research project that uses the protocol outlined below.

Permissionless research is an approach conceptualised by Venkatesh Rao. It’s a philosophy of scientific inquiry that challenges the need for prior authorisation, such as institutional approval, and questions the rigid adherence to standardised procedural templates commonly associated with scientific research, such as the traditional “hypothesis, experiment, result” model.

Instead, it encourages researchers to be driven by their own curiosity and interests, emphasising the importance of individual methodological and thematic preferences. This approach seeks a balance between structured and unstructured research environments, fostering open sharing and collaboration while acknowledging that meaningful consensus can naturally emerge among researchers without the need for rigid oversight.

Permissionless Research Protocol (v0.1.0)

About

Shorthand: /a (domain), -a (graph)

A short summary that describes the target domain of the permissionless research project at a high level and points to its underlying graph.

Graph

Shorthand: /g (domain), -g (graph)

The project’s foundational knowledge graph is composed of nodes and edges that consolidate the activity of researchers, the questions asked, the inputs engaged with, and the outputs that emerge.

The graph has the following basic elements:

  • A page containing the project’s about” statement
  • A page containing the project’s researchers (graph/-r) and a page per unique researcher (graph/-r -name)
  • A page containing the project’s questions (graph/-q) and a page per unique question (graph/-q -question-shorthand)
  • A page containing a list of the project’s inputs (graph/-i) and a page per unique input (graph/-i -input-name)
  • A page containing a list of the project’s outputs (graph/-o) and a page per unique output (graph/-o output-name)
  • A page containing a list of the project’s sustenance (graph/-s) and a page per element of income or expenditure

Any commit to the graph that is not one of these elements (e.g. not a researcher, question, input/output item, sustenance element) should be instantiated as a new node with a unique name (prefixed by -c”) that includes:

  • 50-100 word body content
  • The name of the committing researcher and the date of the commit
  • Links to relevant questions, inputs, outputs and sustenance elements

The operative metaphor for graph commits is a 4x6/3x5 index card. Thus, the content should be succinct (e.g. no copy-pastes of full essays), the title/compression of content should be deliberately formulated and laden with meaning (e.g. self-synthesised), the date and committing researcher should be accurate, and connections to other elements within the graph should be made explicit and updated, where possible, over time within the relevant commit.

Researchers

Shorthand: /r (domain), -r (graph)

Researchers maintain the bounds of the project’s domain, ask questions, provide inputs, synthesis commits and generate outputs that lead to sustenance.

There are multiple types of researchers, each with a different scope, intensity and duration of commitment, each liable for a subset of accrued sustenance, and each with different capabilities in the context of the project.

Each researcher (regardless of type) has a dedicated node in the graph (e.g. graph/-r first last). Researchers are listed first by active to inactive status, then by type in the following manner:

  • Name - type - status - graph link
    • One-line bio
    • Website link(s) (researcher supplied)
    • Type: datetime - datetime

A suggested taxonomy for researchers and their respective characteristics:

  • Core researchers
    • Responsibility: progress of the project as a whole
    • Scope: whole domain as described in the About statement
    • Intensity: up to 20 hours per week
    • Duration: indefinite, no upper bound
    • Compensation: first priority, recurs for duration, modified by intensity
    • Capabilities: full (/a, /q, /i, /g, /o), governed (/s, /r)
  • Visiting researchers
    • Responsibility: progress of project parts/whole within a bounded period
    • Scope: parts/whole of domain as described in the About statement
    • Intensity: up to 20 hours per week
    • Duration: definite, measured in months
    • Compensation: second priority, recurs for duration, modified by intensity
    • Capabilities: full (/q, /i, /g, /o), governed (/a, /s, /r)
  • Guest researchers
    • Responsibility: progress of project part within a bounded period
    • Scope: part of domain as described in the About statement
    • Intensity: up to 20 hours per week
    • Duration: definite, measured in weeks
    • Compensation: third priority, one-off, modified by intensity
    • Capabilities: full (/i, /g, /o), governed (/a, /q, /s, /r)
  • Advisors
    • Responsibility: steer the trajectory of the project in whole or in part
    • Scope: parts/whole of domain as described in the About statement
    • Intensity: up to 4 hours per week
    • Duration: indefinite, no upper bound
    • Compensation: fourth priority, recurs for duration, modified by intensity
    • Capabilities: full (/q, /i, /o), governed (/a, /s, /r, /g)
  • Contributors
    • Responsibilities: provide a singular contribution to a project part
    • Scope: part of domain as described in the About statement
    • Intensity: up to 40 total hours
    • Duration: definite, measured in hours and days
    • Compensation: fifth priority, one-off, modified by intensity
    • Capabilities: governed (/a, /q, /i, /g, /o, /s, /r)

Questions

Shorthand: /q (domain), -q (graph)

A list of deliberately posed inquiries concerning the target domain that guide the attention and activity of active researchers.

Each question has a dedicated node in in the graph (e.g. graph/-q question compression). It’s title is shorthand for the question and its body content is composed of the full question and a contextualising paragraph.

Questions are listed in the following manner:

  • Statement of question (graph link)
    • Contextualising paragraph
    • Status (active/inactive): datetime - datetime

Inputs

Shorthand: /i (domain), -i (graph)

A list of inputs (e.g. books, essays, resources) that have catalysed the creation of at least one commit in the project’s graph. Each input receives its own node in the graph (e.g. -i An Essay) and is referenced in the relevant commits.

Outputs

Shorthand: /o (domain), -o (graph)

A collection of outputs that emerge as a result of researcher’s interactions with questions, inputs, graph nodes and graph edges.

Each output receive its own node in the graph (e.g. graph/-o A Podcast) which may be used to form the output itself and is referenced in the relevant commits.

Outputs themselves are delivered via external channels and mediums, as opposed to within the confines of the project infrastructure itself (e.g. a publication of a paper in a journal). The output list links to the output’s destination.

Sustenance

Shorthand: /s (domain), -s (graph)

Sustenance is what enables the project itself to sustain and progress over time. It may or may not be in the form of currency. Sustenance could be derived from multiple sources, such as:

  • External parties donating to the project as a whole
  • Particular questions being allocated funding by institutions
  • Compensation received for the provision of outputs

The parent page (e.g. graph/-s) logs the inflow and outflow of sustenance in various forms, and each primary type of sustenance (e.g. a subscription to a service) receives its own node (e.g. graph/-s service name).

It is suggested that any sustenance received (in the form of capital or otherwise) will be allocated in the following order:

  • KTLO: to cover the minimum requirements to ensure the project is not dead
  • OpEx (project infrastructure): to purchase foundational products and services
  • OpEx (inflation hedge): a pot to mitigate reasonable future increases in OpEx
  • OpEx (researchers): to compensate active researchers
  • CapEx: a pot for future project purchases and investments